From Bloomberg Law:

The University of La Verne College of Law enrolls over 100 students each year, and if past history is any indication, only slightly more than half, 54 percent, will likely pass the bar on their first try after graduation.

Should that affect whether it stays open?

The disconnect between a school’s low bar passage rate, relative to other schools in the country, and its ability to draw applicants raises a question that’s been looming for legal education regulators: Is the bar passage rate the best way to measure whether a law school is adequately preparing its students to become lawyers?

On one side, there are voices urging the ABA to raise the standard of graduates who must pass the bar exam on their first attempt. They say the high cost of a legal education means schools owe it to their students to guarantee a certain level of success and chance of a career in the law.

Others argue the ABA’s standards would limit diversity in the legal profession by disproportionately forcing the closure of law schools that serve historically underrepresented populations. They claim a focus on bar passage rates does not adequately capture their success or account for the role they play in their communities.

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