Bob Buckley: Life lessons on persistence and the love of learning

I doubt I will ever be asked to give a commencement speech, but if I did I would say something like this:

I was not a very good high school student. In fact, I was never a good college student either. No one should look to me as a model of how to excel in high school or college. I did not study much, and I was very lazy. In high school I did not take any math classes after I barely passed geometry. I have always claimed that side of my brain did not work well, but the truth is that I did not do well in math because I never saw the point. Of course, problem solving is an important skill to develop, but I chose not to do it at a young age.

I graduated near the top of my class at William Chrisman only because they did not have weighted classes. In college I took the most difficult classes on a pass-fail basism always striving to be the dumbest one to pass. Because of my poor math skills, it is doubtful that I could get accepted to UMKC today. So, as you enter the next phase of your life I will ask that you do as I say and not as I do.

Yet, there was a point when things changed. I had always wanted to be a lawyer. When I graduated from college in 1975 there were a lot of people smarter than me who wanted to go to law school. Because I excelled at laziness and mediocrity I was not prepared to do well on the Law School Admission Test. When I finally entered law school in 1977 it was only because I had spent two years getting a master’s degree in public administration where A grades were handed out like candy on Halloween. I discovered that I could continue in my laziness and still get a 3.9 grade point, which allowed me to get admitted to law school.

When I received the letter making me one of 165 students in the class of 1980, I was […]

Bob Buckley: Life lessons on persistence and the love of learning

I doubt I will ever be asked to give a commencement speech, but if I did I would say something like this:

I was not a very good high school student. In fact, I was never a good college student either. No one should look to me as a model of how to excel in high school or college. I did not study much, and I was very lazy. In high school I did not take any math classes after I barely passed geometry. I have always claimed that side of my brain did not work well, but the truth is that I did not do well in math because I never saw the point. Of course, problem solving is an important skill to develop, but I chose not to do it at a young age.

I graduated near the top of my class at William Chrisman only because they did not have weighted classes. In college I took the most difficult classes on a pass-fail basism always striving to be the dumbest one to pass. Because of my poor math skills, it is doubtful that I could get accepted to UMKC today. So, as you enter the next phase of your life I will ask that you do as I say and not as I do.

Yet, there was a point when things changed. I had always wanted to be a lawyer. When I graduated from college in 1975 there were a lot of people smarter than me who wanted to go to law school. Because I excelled at laziness and mediocrity I was not prepared to do well on the Law School Admission Test. When I finally entered law school in 1977 it was only because I had spent two years getting a master’s degree in public administration where A grades were handed out like candy on Halloween. I discovered that I could continue in my laziness and still get a 3.9 grade point, which allowed me to get admitted to law school.

When I received the letter making me one of 165 students in the class of 1980, I was […]

LPC Legal Practice Course

Faculties and Schools Our collaboration with The University of Law (ULaw) makes UEA the ideal place to pursue your ambition to become a lawyer.

If you are aiming to become a solicitor, you are now able to complete both your academic and vocational study at UEA. After you have completed one of our LLB qualifying law degrees or converted your non-law degree through our Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) , you can now enrol on the Legal Practice Course (LPC) taught by the University of Law at UEA’s campus in Norwich.

The LPC bridges the gap between academic study and training in a law firm and means you will not have to move away from Norwich before taking up employment with a law firm. We’re confident that ULaw’s LPC is the best preparation for entering legal practice by offering you the skills to succeed in the business world. After all, ULaw is the preferred LPC training provider to more than 30 major law firms.

Discover more about the LPC and The University of Law.

See the University of Law LPC page for further details of entry requirements. What will you study?

See the University of Law LPC page for further details of course content.

Meet Fred Tutman, the Patuxent Riverkeeper

Image by Fred Tutman used with permission. Fred Tutman is the Patuxent Riverkeeper, one of a global network of 343 people who advocate for individual rivers. He’s also the nation’s only African-American Riverkeeper.

Locally, there’s a Potomac Riverkeeper and an Anacostia Riverkeeper; there are Riverkeepers (or, for non-rivers, other Waterkeepers) from Argentina to Vietnam .

Born and raised along the Patuxent in Maryland, as with seven generations before him, Tutman founded the Patuxent Riverkeeper organization in 2004. Having spent 27 years in media, television, and radio, along with a stint as a late-life law student, Tutman traded in his law books and reporting expertise to protect his home river.

I spoke with Tutman to learn more about his work and to get his perspective on the most pressing environmental and equity issues facing our regional rivers.

Can you tell our readers what a Riverkeeper is?

A Riverkeeper is an advocate who has a license. It’s a capital letter first of all. It’s a proper noun. We’re Advocates. We are expected to protect water quality and build a movement around the protection of water quality on the exclusive jurisdiction that we’re licensed for.

In my case, that’s the Patuxent River. It’s a geopolitically significant river in the state of Maryland. Citizens along the Patuxent were literally suing before the Clean Water Act was enacted. In fact, the origins of the Save the Bay movement are entirely from the impetus or the example set by Patuxent advocates.

Why did you became a Riverkeeper?

I worked in media television and radio for 27 years. I lived overseas and in Massachusetts for a while, but the Patuxent’s my home river. So as a citizen activist it never occurred to me you could make a career out of protecting a river until I learned about the Riverkeeper movement. That really brought onto my radar screen that you could be a gadfly or an irritant as a citizen activist and actually make a living doing that.At the time [in 2002] I was in law school. I was the late life law student. I hadn’t decided what to do with […]

The Law Schools Where The Most Graduates Got State Clerkships (2018)

(Image via Getty) If you’re a law student who’s interested in a clerkship, but you’ve missed the boat on landing a coveted position with a federal judge, worry not — there are still plenty of options for you at the state level. It’s not only the strength of your application that matters for securing a state clerkship. Attending a law school with high placement rates for state and local clerkships can be very helpful too, as it reflects past graduates’ reputation with judges, and the law school’s pull within the local community. But which law schools have the greatest influence when it comes to state clerkships?

Law.com produced several helpful charts based on law school employment data for the class of 2018. Today, we will take a look at one of the most valuable charts for those who are interested in staying local, the law schools that sent the highest percentage of their most recent graduating class into state clerkships.

Here are the top 15 law schools that appear on the list:

1. Seton Hall: 56.96 percent
2. Rutgers: 52.15 percent
3. Baltimore: 33.33 percent
4. U. St. Thomas: 31.68 percent
5. Maryland: 29.29 percent
6. Nevada: 24.53 percent
7. Hawaii: 23.16 percent
8. Roger Williams: 22.73 percent
9. Montana: 21.74 percent
10. Widener-Delaware: 21.70 percent
11. South Carolina: 21.47 percent 12. Widener-Commonwealth: 20.75 percent 13. Maine: 20.00 percent 14. Minnesota: 19.79 percent 15. Drexel: 19.38 percentClick here to see the rest of the law schools with the highest percentage of graduates employed in state clerkships, plus other informative charts detailing the law schools with the highest percentage of graduates working in Biglaw , federal clerkships , and government and public interest , as well as the law schools with the most unemployed and most underemployed graduates.Are you a recent law school graduate who landed a state clerkship? What did your law school do to help you? We’re interested in learning about your experiences — good or bad — and may anonymously feature some of your stories on Above the Law. You can email us , text us at (646) 820-8477 […]

Choosing Your A-level Subjects

The Student Lawyer has other articles to assist with making your A-level subject choice. This article will address the specific instance where you are certain you want to study a Law degree but don’t know what A-levels to take. 1. Take 4 first year options.

This almost goes without saying. Still, having spoken to many peers, I think this was an significant point that I couldn’t afford to skip over. In your first year (formerly known as the AS year) when starting sixth form you should choose four subjects (or more, depending on your capacity and school). This is important because most traditional universities for Law in the UK and beyond will consider your subject choices and grades when you apply in the upper sixth year (second year of A-levels). Having fewer than four subjects at this point will immediately put you at a disadvantage. It is of course possible to drop one of the four subjects in second year if the workload gets too intense. Three good A-level grades are more convincing than four average ones. 2. Core/Facilitating Subjects

A more important point I’d like to bring home is that these should be “traditional” or “core” subjects. Sixth form is a time for deciding on a degree, so A-levels are ultimately just a means to an end. Traditional universities, particularly Oxbridge, much prefer students who have studied tried and tested subjects and scored well. As the Law degree does not have specific subject requirements, students are often free to choose from quite a wide range of subjects, typically English Literature, History, Languages (Classical and Modern), Geography, Chemistry, Biology, Economics, Physics and surprisingly even Mathematics and Further Mathematics.

Note, Law or Business Law at A-levels are not considered “core” subjects. The law you will learn in that course differs greatly from the Law degree so it may even be detrimental to your application. 3. Play to your strengths; not forgetting your interests

Many teachers will advise you to choose subjects you have typically done well in. Most students will know by this stage which ones are their strengths and […]

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