Say no more to pen and paper – this fall, the Law School Admission Test will now only be offered in a digital format for prospective applicants. The LSAT is the last of graduate-school entrance exams to undergo this process, as all other national graduate exams have been digitized for several years.

The digital LSAT was first launched during the July 15 test administration, with half of test-takers assigned to take the exam on a tablet while the other half assigned to the traditional pen-and-paper format. However, Sept. 21 was the first test date in which everyone across the country took the exam on a tablet.

In the latest law school application data released by UC San Diego, from 2012 to 2016, UCSD had an average of 302 students each year apply to law school. UCSD applicants are admitted to American Bar Association-accredited law schools at a higher rate nationally, boasting an 86-percent average acceptance rate compared to the 76-percent nationwide average. It be like that. pic.twitter.com/lv5tFm4jKJ — Blueprint LSAT Prep (@BlueprintLSAT) September 27, 2019 According to Jeff Thomas, the executive director of pre-law programs at Kaplan Test Prep, the LSAT is an incredibly time-pressured exam and is the number one most important factor in law school admissions. He explained to the UCSD Guardian that every extra point that a student gets on the exam would potentially put them ahead of thousands of test-takers.

“Many students often have trouble finishing in the time allotted,” Thomas said. “In a paper-and-pencil format, there is a proctor with a watch on his or her wrist. A proctor giving 34.5 versus 35.25 minutes could actually make a difference in the scores. A digital test means that everything would remain consistent.”

Thomas went on to explain that the new digital format would allow for both more test dates and a quicker score turnaround.

“A digital test would allow more test dates because there are less logistics, such as scantrons and test booklets, involved,” Thomas said. “The last benefit is that students can get their score back faster because there would be no manual score processing.”

Thomas emphasized that students should […]

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